Watch Bernie Sanders Discuss Brussels Attack on ‘Kimmel’

Bernie Sanders visited Jimmy Kimmel Live on “Western Tuesday,” the same day a terror attack killed over 30 people in Brussels, Belgium. During his interview with Kimmel, Sanders spoke about stopping ISIS as well as why Americans are more inclined to align with tough-talking candidates in the aftermath of a terror attack.

“I think people get afraid, and for good reason. ISIS is a disgusting, barbaric organization – we’ve seen what they’ve done in Paris, what they’ve done in Brussels – and people are afraid of an attack in the United States,” Sanders said. “But what we have to understand is that we’re not gonna undermine the Constitution of the United States of America in order to effectively destroy ISIS. We can do that. So our goal in this issue is to destroy ISIS in coalition with Muslim nations on the ground, with the support of the United States and other major powers. I think we can do that.”

Sanders said the key to stopping ISIS, in addition to the military, is better information sharing between nations as well as preventing radicals from engaging with these terror groups via social media. “At the end of the day, we can not allow the Trumps of the world to use these incidents to attack all of the Muslim people in the world. That is unfair,” Sanders added. “To imply that because somebody is a Muslim, they are a terrorist, that is an outrageous statement, equally so when he talks about Mexicans coming over the border are rapists and criminals. That is not what this country is about. We don’t need, in my view, a candidate running for president hurling these types of insults.”

Sanders later revealed that he has never met Donald Trump – “I didn’t go to his wedding either,” a poke at Hillary Clinton, who was in attendance at the nuptials – and that while he supports states’ rights to decide legalizing marijuana, he’s more concerned about issues that will affect his grandchildren’s future, like climate control and lead poisoned water.

Sanders also admitted that he and Clinton sometimes have private conversations, and that he’s not to blame for Clinton’s “historic” “unfavorability numbers” in some polls. “What I have tried to do in this campaign is focus on the real issues impacting the American people,” Sanders said. “We have been very careful about not attacking Secretary Clinton in any kind of personal way. Other people do that, we have not.”

Florida politicians react to Brussels attacks

Attackers detonated bombs at the airport and on a metro train beneath the European Union’s capital on Tuesday, killing at least 26 people and confirming the worst fears of European officials, who proclaimed the continent at war.

Here is a compilation of reactions by Florida politicians to the attacks:

U.S. Senator Bill Nelson:

“Now is the time for steady resolve as we continue to press against the scourge of terrorism. Our thoughts and prayers are with all of the victims of today’s horrific attacks and their families. The bombings in Brussels are a reminder that we must remain vigilant and ‘if you see something, say something’.”

U.S. Senator Marco Rubio:

“This is the latest evidence that the civilized world is under siege from a determined enemy who exploits any openness in our societies to inflict the most harm possible on innocent civilians. ‎My condolences to the families of those lost today and my prayers go out to all those who have been injured. The United States and Europe must be united in striking ISIS wherever they seek safe haven to dismantle this terrorist threat once and for all.”

Governor Rick Scott:

“Thoughts and prayers with the victims their families in Brussels today. Thankful for our military and law enforcement for keeping us safe.”

Lieutenant Governor and U.S. Senate candidate Carlos Lopez-Cantera:

“Our prayers are with the people of Belgium and the victims of these horrific terrorist attacks in Brussels. These attacks of radical extremist terrorism are a painful reminder that the threat of ISIS continues to be a clear and present danger. As President Obama enjoys his Caribbean vacation in Cuba, which was until recently a state sponsor of terrorism, he has yet to outline any concrete plans for eliminating ISIS. We must develop a strategy where America leads and we work with our allies around the globe to wholly and completely wipe ISIS off the face of the planet.”

U.S. Rep. Kathy Castor:

“As I have said before, nothing is more important than the safety of the families of my neighbors and all Americans. We must ensure that law enforcement, intelligence agencies and military service members have the tools they need to keep us safe.  I will continue to work to provide the resources and the will to ourselves and our allies. We will keep America tough and smart and safe.”

U.S. Rep. and U.S. Senate candidate Ron DeSantis:

U.S. Rep. Alcee Hastings:

 “I am overcome with sadness and anger today, but take solace in knowing that those responsible for these cowardly attacks will be brought to swift and total justice. All of Europe was targeted by this morning’s savagery, yet the values that unite us remain unshaken. We will never relent in our fight against terrorism.”

U.S. Rep. and U.S. Senate candidate David Jolly:

“Today’s barbaric and unjustifiable attacks underscore the need for America and the world to stand united against terrorism.  We also stand united in supporting the people of Belgium and send our deepest condolences to the victims impacted by these attacks. It is times like this that we remain resolved in our fight to protect and preserve the freedoms and liberties that are the foundation of the free world. Let us also be clear, the actions of ISIS or any other terror organization wishing to do harm to innocent people will not dim the light of democracy. These attacks are a solemn reminder that we face a real security threat and we must resolve to confront it before it again reaches our homeland.”

U.S. Rep. and U.S. Senate candidate Patrick Murphy:

“The American people stand in solidarity with Belgium today in condemning the terrorist attacks that struck Brussels this morning. Our thoughts and prayers are with all the victims of these bombings. Our international community must remain united and vigilant in combating extremism and terrorism wherever it occurs.”

U.S. Rep. Tom Rooney:

“My thoughts and prayers go out to the families of those killed and injured today in Brussels,” Rooney said. “ISIS claimed responsibility for these attacks. It’s the latest in a systematic threat which ISIS leadership has been calling for for years, and it will not end here. Europe is the current battleground and will see more attacks like this and Paris. It will only be a matter of time before attacks like this are mounted on a much larger scale in the United States than what we saw in San Bernardino. ISIS has told us that is their goal. They have kept all of their promises so far, so I don’t know why we would ignore them now. We can either sit back and wait to be attacked or we can work with our allies to put an end to ISIS. That is our choice. So far we haven’t been up to the task, as evidence by Brussels this morning.”

House Speaker Steve Crisafulli, via Twitter:

“Praying for #Brussels today. The War on Terror is still very real, and it’s a war we can’t afford to lose.”

State Sen. Thad Altman, via Twitter:

“Prayers for the people of Brussels, Belgium, the victims and their families, following the attacks in their country.”

State Sen. Lizbeth Benacquisto, via Twitter:

“My prayers are with the families affected by evil in Brussels today, and I thank our military for keeping us safe at home.”

State Rep. Matt Gaetz, Twitter:

“My thoughts and prayers go out to the people of Brussels. America must stand united with our allies to wipe Islamic terrorism off the map.”

State Rep. Shevrin Jones, vai Twitter:

“Truth is, we have hateful people. We must pray for peace in our world. Prayers to the lives lost in Belgium.”

State Rep. Jeanette Nunez, via Twitter:

“My thoughts and prayers are with all the victims of the terror attacks in #Brussels #Belgium. May God give you comfort and peace.”

State Rep. Kathleen Passidomo, via Facebook:

“My thoughts and prayers are with the Belgian people and all those affected by today’s terror attacks. We must remain vigilant at home and abroad to prevent future acts of brutality.”

State Rep. Ross Spano, via Twitter:

“My thoughts and prayers go out to Brussels and the victims and families whose lives are forever changed by this unthinkable act of terrorism.”

U.S. Senate candidate Todd Wilcox:

“Our enemies are waging a war we must not continue to ignore,” said Wilcox. “The loss of life, the brutal injuries and the destruction that have rocked Brussels are unconscionable, and we as a people must decide that enough is enough.

“Their soldiers don’t march in lock step and they don’t answer to a single general. What they lack in conventional organization, they more than make up for in savagery and disregard for human life. Paris, San Bernardino and now Brussels – their only pattern is that of opportunities seized in the void of real American leadership.

“We are at war whether President Obama wants to admit it or not. Arab Sunni Islamic Terrorists have declared war on all of western society and America. The piece meal attempts to stave off ISIS expansion are not working. The Obama administration is erroneously focusing America’s diplomatic efforts to broker an ever elusive peace in Syria with total disregard for the realities on the ground and a naive assumption that removing Bashir Al Asad will somehow lead to ISIS abandoning their apocalyptic objectives. This isn’t leadership, it’s passive ignorance.”

The Florida GOP offered this image:

pray for belgium

Arizona is the biggest prize for Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders in Tuesday’s primaries

Facing an increasingly narrow path to the Democratic nomination, Bernie Sanders aimed to halt, or at least slow, his candidacy’s slide on Tuesday.

Democrats in Arizona, Idaho and Utah were making their choices as Hillary Clinton attempted to tighten her grip on the race.

The day’s biggest prize was Arizona, with more delegates up for grabs than the other two states combined.

Sanders campaigned heavily there, pressing forward with his message about income inequality and urging voters to take a gamble on his more ambitious liberal agenda. He spent $1.3 million on advertising there, more than double Clinton, according to data from SMG Delta.

“What this campaign is about is asking Americans to think outside the box,” said Sanders at a rally in Flagstaff on Monday night.

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Sanders, the Vermont senator and self-described democratic socialist, was hungry for wins after a series of losses to Clinton, the former secretary of State. She started building her lead at the beginning of the month with landslide victories in southern states, only to suffer a surprise loss in Michigan on March 8.

Even Sanders’ victory in Michigan illustrated the uphill nature of his battle. Clinton won by a much larger margin that same night in Mississippi’s primary, so, thanks to proportional allocation, she came away with a bigger lead in delegates.

She then regained her footing and swept Sanders in all five states that voted March 15, including Ohio and Florida.

Clinton has won 319 more pledged delegates than Sanders, according to an Associated Press tally. She’s also supported by the vast majority of superdelegates, party leaders and elected officials who can decide for themselves which candidate to support and aren’t bound by voters’ picks in nominating contests.

Despite increasing pressure on Sanders to wind down his candidacy, he’s kept up his fight against Clinton. He criticized her in Flagstaff for financing her campaign with corporate donations and receiving payments for “speeches on Wall Street behind closed doors.”

Clinton had a double-digit lead in the Arizona polls over Sanders and mentioned him only once in her speech at a high school gym in Phoenix on Monday while describing their differing views on making college more affordable.

She spent more time criticizing Republicans.

“The stakes in this election just keep getting higher and higher, and the rhetoric on the other side keeps getting lower and lower,” Clinton said.

Five things to watch as Arizona and Utah voters head to the polls

Five things to watch as Arizona and Utah voters head to the polls

It’s not exactly Tiny Tuesday. But after weeks of high-stakes, cross-country balloting, today’s presidential contests make for a fairly modest go-round.

Only a few states will be voting. Arizona holds its primary and Utah its precinct-level caucuses. Democrats in Idaho will also caucus.

A mere…

It’s not exactly Tiny Tuesday. But after weeks of high-stakes, cross-country balloting, today’s presidential contests make for a fairly modest go-round.

Only a few states will be voting. Arizona holds its primary and Utah its precinct-level caucuses. Democrats in Idaho will also caucus.

A mere…

(Mark Z. Barabak)

She said that she understands Americans’ frustrations, but that she had never seen such a divisive, mean-spirited presidential race.

“Anger is not a strategy,” she said. “We have to roll up our sleeves and get to work.”

Mark Kaelber, 54, wore a Clinton button, T-shirt and sticker to the candidate’s rally and said he was disappointed by Sanders’ recent attacks.

“I have always admired Bernie, but it’s gotten really nasty. He’s implying Hillary is corrupt and bought and paid for. He needs to stop,” said Kaelber, a university admissions advisor. “It seems like he can’t accept the fact he’s not going to win. It doesn’t do anyone any good by him continually being negative toward her.”

Other Clinton supporters worried that Sanders has focused too narrowly on income inequality at the expense of other important issues.

“I love Bernie. My only concern with him is that he has been too much of a one-issue candidate,” said Kris Kyllo, a 65-year-old retiree from Chandler.

While campaigning in Arizona, both Clinton and Sanders sharply criticized Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who is nationally recognized for his hard-line stance against immigrants in the U.S. illegally.

Donald Trump on track to become the Republican nominee, Sanders has highlighted polls that show him beating the New York businessman in a general election by a wider margin than Clinton.

“There is no question that you are looking at the strongest Democratic candidate,” he said Monday.

His campaign team has repeatedly described the primary calendar as skewed in Clinton’s favor for the first half of the nominating contests and expect Sanders to pick up steam in western states such as Washington, which holds its caucuses Saturday.

“We’re at halftime here, and we agree we’re behind, but we think we’re going to win this game,” said Sanders strategist Tad Devine last week.

Jeff Weaver, Sanders’ campaign manager, expressed frustration with the sentiment that Clinton was already locking down the nomination, calling it a “media drumbeat to essentially disenfranchise half of the Democratic voters.”

Twitter: @chrismegerian and @LATSeema

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Jac VerSteeg: Political fratricide model fails Marco Rubio

Marco Rubio was convinced the Fratricide Model of politics was his ticket to the top. Now, after one brilliant win and one spectacular loss, the Florida senator claims to have renounced the model.

He will not, he says, run for governor in 2018. Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam need not fear a Rubio challenge.

We won’t have Marco Rubio to kick around anymore?

Political fratricide worked for Rubio in 2010 when he broke in line to oppose and defeat Gov. Charlie Crist for a U.S. Senate seat. He was helped along by that year’s Tea Party revolt and the fact that newly Independent Crist and Democrat Kendrick Meek split the no-to-Rubio vote.

Just as angry as the 2010 Tea Party faithful but with a new idol, Florida GOP primary voters this month delivered the final blow to Rubio’s second attempt at exploiting the Fratricide Model. They gave Donald Trump a victory in every county except Rubio’s Miami-Dade refuge.

What effect did Rubio’s fratricidal challenge to his mentor (and his better) Jeb Bush have on the contest? What if Rubio had shown respect, bided his time and supported Bush? No way to know, but Florida might have been the firewall for Bush and the anti-Trumpers that it so dismally failed to be for Rubio.

I do not think that every intra-party challenge can be characterized as an example of the Fratricide Model. It’s appropriate for rivals in the same party to let voters decide between them. But when one of the challengers has not earned the right to vie for an office and, further, damages the party or the office he seeks, that is political fratricide.

And that is what Rubio has done. He knocked off Crist – once a Republican rising star – and proceeded to disdain the Senate seat he won. As a result, the seat easily could go to a Democrat this November.

Then, of course, Rubio challenged Jeb. After helping to undermine the clear choice of the GOP establishment, Rubio proceeded to run a horrible campaign. The overall effect boosted Trump’s prospects and hurt the Republican Party.

What will Rubio do next? He claimed, upon returning to work in the Senate – if someone so often a no-show can be said to “return to work” – that, in addition to eschewing a gubernatorial bid, he would not be anybody’s veep.

You never know what to make of a politician’s claim that he won’t seek this or that office. How many times did now-House Speaker Paul Ryan claim that he would not accept the post? (By the way, Ryan also insists he won’t allow himself to be nominated at a fractured GOP convention this summer. Right.)

For Rubio, who has been assailed for overweening ambition, what better strategy than to affect a new humility and express no ambition whatsoever for political office?

Is it really believable that if, by some miracle, he emerges as a vice presidential candidate – perhaps for Ryan at a brokered convention – Rubio would turn down the chance?

It is more believable that Rubio does not plan to run for governor in 2018. Not because he doesn’t lust after political office, but because he was so badly burned this year by the Fratricide Model. Even Rubio should be able to see that he is less qualified and less deserving than the premier GOP candidate for the job, Putnam.

Putnam served in the Florida Legislature and then went on to serve in Congress for 10 years. Unlike Rubio, Putnam actually performed his job diligently and rose to be the third-highest ranking Republican in the U.S. House.

Then, rather than stay in a secure seat in federal office, Putnam chose to return to state politics and has been elected and re-elected as Ag commissioner.

It is worth emphasizing that Putnam’s chosen trajectory brought him voluntarily back to Florida. Rubio’s chosen path was to attempt to move into the White House. Only a failure to reach that goal could bring him the “consolation prize” of a gubernatorial campaign. And even if he were elected governor, he would just treat it as a stepping stone back onto the national stage.

Could Rubio beat Putnam? Considering his drubbing on the Ides of March, the likely answer is no. His decision not to run for governor easily could be a case of sour grapes rather than an example of his newfound humility.

Since Rubio decided to give up his Senate seat, it is hard to see any political path that puts him back on that stage. His best option? Hope that anybody but Trump wins and that Rubio could find a spot in a Ted Cruz or John Kasich administration and bide his time.

But does anyone think that if Rubio saw a chance to return to political prominence he would hesitate to seize it even if it meant running over one of his Republican brethren? Oh, brother.

***

Jac Wilder VerSteeg is a columnist for The South Florida Sun Sentinel, former deputy editorial page editor for The Palm Beach Post and former editor of Context Florida. 

Bernie Sanders’s Global Victory Over Hillary Clinton

As I wrote back in February—or March on the other side of the international dateline—the first balloting occurred in Wellington, New Zealand, where Sanders beat Clinton 21-6 in a midnight meet-up at a pub. The final total in the country was 476-63.

Republicans don’t hold an equivalent contest for ex-pats, making the Democrats Abroad tally the only real guess at how Americans overseas are thinking about the election. The largest totals come from exactly the countries one might expect: Canada, Australia, and Western Europe. An openly unscientific poll conducted by Military Times found that members of the armed forces back Trump and Sanders most, but those numbers are not statistically sound nor broken out by those living at home or abroad.

Democrats Abroad also get four superdelegates—or rather, eight superdelegates, each worth half a delegate. Clinton has secured commitments from three and Sanders one.

The results provide an interesting snapshot of opinion abroad, but its meaning is less than clear. It seems likely that Americans who live abroad are a more liberal group, which would explain their tilt toward Sanders. But he’s been criticized for his foreign-policy stances, which critics call vague, especially on the Middle East. Nonetheless, he handily won each Middle Eastern country, including Egypt, Lebanon, Turkey, the UAE, and Israel. He also won five of the seven votes cast in Afghanistan. As for Clinton, her term as secretary of state doesn’t appear to have won her much favor with the ex-pats.

Sanders vows to fight Clinton all the way to the convention, despite his steep delegate disadvantage. The nine delegates he picks up from overseas should help him some, though he still trails significantly.

Shelby Farah murder trial resumes Monday in Jacksonville

Celllphone store clerk Shelby Farah‘s 2013 slaying shocked Jacksonville to its core.  And a sharp debate continues between the State Attorney’s Office and the Public Defender’s Office on whether the trial of James Xavier Rhodes should be a death penalty case.

Farah’s mother, Darlene Farah, and State Attorney’s Office prosecutor Bernie de la Rionda disagree that the death penalty should be sought for defendant Rhodes.

Rhodes shot and killed Shelby Farah, 20, during a 2013 robbery of the Northside MetroPSC store at 3100 N. Main St. N. where she worked.

Darlene Farah has asked as recently as this month that the death penalty not be applied in this case.

Public Defender Matt Shirk asserted in a letter to State Attorney Angela Corey last month, “Mrs. Farah has been particularly vocal concerning her opposition to your office’s decision to seek the death penalty for her daughter Shelby’s murder.”

If the death penalty is pursued, Shirk asserts,  “this case will continue to be litigated for the next 20 or 30 or 40 years. I believe that with every motion, petition or appeal filed on Mr. Rhodes’ behalf, she will relive the pain and loss she has felt since losing Shelby.”

The Farah family has been mourning for two years and seven months since her slaying.

It’s still fresh in her mother’s consciousness. Part of the reason why, Farah says, is that in recent days, “I have seen the video of my daughter getting killed repeatedly.

“James Rhodes didn’t take away one life. He took away many lives. Our lives will never be the same. My life will never be the same,” Farah said Sunday.

Such statement usually help make the case for a maximum penalty. Farah, however, calls it “pathetic that people are trying to use my daughter’s death for their [political] benefit.”

Her blunt take on the case is that many parties have political agendas that are taking priority over her and her family’s needs.

“The days before court dates,” Farah said, are “pure hell” at her house. Indeed, during the 31 months since her daughter’s death her mind has continually been occupied with it.

They are months that have torn the family apart. The kids have a hard time being at home where their sister’s absence remains an open wound, she said. Meanwhile, she said, the case has driven a wedge between her and her son.

Farah, a Jacksonville native, opposes the death penalty in this case, saying that the “state failed … raised and created James Rhodes.” He had been a ward of the state since his parents abandoned him at age 5.  He received physical and sexual abuse in a boys’ home.

Farah’s son supports the death penalty in the case. In spite of his mother’s pleas with the SAO to not show him the video, it was done. Since then, she said, her son has not slept at home, and says that “he hates me” and “never comes home.”

“I can’t help but feel like they are trying to play my son against me,” she said.

Despite her son’s position on capital punishment, Farah said that if Shelby were alive “she’d be trying to help James Rhodes.”

“Everybody always called Shelby the peacemaker,” her mother said.

There is little peace in the Farah home, and hasn’t been in the past 31 months. Farah tells of cooking Christmas dinner and he children decided not to be around to eat it.

Dinner went into the garbage.

Meanwhile, for Darlene Farah, the worries pile up. Her son, years ago, was making trips to visit college football programs. Played multiple positions at Cedar Creek High. Ran a 4.6 40.

“He’s so smart,” Farah added. “Always got perfect FCAT scores.”

Now? He’s dropped out of high school. Drinks more. And his mother frets.

“My son’s going to end up in a morgue or a prison,” Farah said if things don’t turn around.

“I done buried one child. I don’t want to bury another,” Farah said.

The trial resumes Monday morning in Courtroom 503 in the Duval County Courthouse. Long after final sentencing, though, the trial will continue for the Farah family.

Hillary Clinton wages costly fight with Bernie Sanders

Hillary Clinton raised $30.1 million last month and spent even more as she worked to lock up the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination, campaign-finance reports filed Sunday show.

More than half her February spending — $17.4 million — went into advertising buys as Clinton raced to rack up delegates in her battle with Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders. She also spent about $4.3 million on payroll and related staffing expenses last month.

The reports also show Clinton donated nearly $93,000 to her own campaign last month in the form of “in-kind payroll and benefits.”

Despite the heavy spending, Clinton started March with $30.8 million in available cash and last week won five more states, extending her delegate lead over Sanders.

Sanders, who has attracted hordes of small donors to his populist campaign, previously announced collecting a whopping $42.7 million in February, but had not filed his fundraising report to the Federal Election Commission as of late Sunday afternoon.

The Clinton’s report shows she is getting better at raising money from smaller donors. Nearly 30% of the money she raised from individuals donors last month came in amounts of $200 or smaller, compared to roughly 20% for the entire election cycle.

Her campaign aides boasted Sunday that she now has collected campaign money from more than 1 million donors.

“Thanks to the 1 million people who have now contributed to our campaign and the more than 8.6 million people who have supported Hillary Clinton with their votes, we have the resources we need to continue to run a strong campaign all across the country and a nearly insurmountable pledged delegate lead,” campaign manager Robby Mook said in a statement.

Bernie Sanders on the Border: ‘We Don’t Need a Wall’

Presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders called the controversy over immigration “trumped up” today during a visit to the U.S.-Mexico border near Nogales, Arizona, just days before the primary in this southwest state.

“The so-called immigration problem we face today at this particular moment, is a trumped up and exaggerated problem,” he said during a hillside press conference with the expansive, brown border fence stretching off into the distance behind him. His microphone was run off of a generator.

Sanders went on to quote numbers from the Pew research center that indicate more people have been going from the United State to Mexico, rather than the other way around.

“We don’t need a wall and we don’t need barbwire,” He said. “We need to fix our broken criminal justice system. First and foremost, it goes without saying that we need comprehensive immigration reform, we need to take 11 million undocumented people out of the shadows, out of fear, and we need to provide them with legal protection, and we need to provide them with a path toward citizenship.”

The Vermont senator said he would end the “deportation regime” currently at work in the country and spoke at length about “fear” and “sadness” he has seen in families torn apart by deportations. When asked specifically if he believed President Obama was part of that “regime” he said, “Yes.”

“The rounding up of families that happened around Christmas time and continues to happen must end, and as president I will end it,” he said before listing several of his immigration policy proposals, including expanding the deferred action program for immigrants who came to the country as children (DACA) as well as the proposals to grant status to parents of legal residents.

While touring the Morely Gate Border Crossing by foot, he spoke briefly with one DREAMer and another young woman who recently received asylum status.

He also spoke at length about ending private prisons and detention centers and called the work of Maricopa County, Arizona, Sheriff Joe Arpaio “inhumane” and a “disgrace.” Sanders’ wife, Jane Sanders, recently had a run-in with Arpaio during a visit to one of his so-called tent cities, which the senator called an “ambush.”

Arpaio endorsed Republican frontrunner, Donald Trump, who is also campaigning in Arizona this weekend. Sanders had strong words for the businessman as well.

“I would hope that all of us are rightly appalled by the divisive bigoted and xenophobic comments of people like Donald Trump,” he said motioning to the border. “Trump’s labeling of Mexicans as rapists and criminals repulses all Americans of good will. Mexico is our neighbor, which we have extremely important relations with. To insult an entire nation is not befitting of anybody, let alone a candidate for president of the United States.”

Sanders’ primary opponent, Hillary Clinton, has not yet made a stop at the border during this campaign. When asked if he was trying to distinguish himself from her by coming to this site, the senator replied, “Well, I just wanted to make it very clear that I think we have a crisis in this country with 11 million undocumented people, that so many people, and I have met a lot of them, are living in fear and that they are being exploited.”

Bernie Sanders will not attend AIPAC conference

AIPAC has a tradition of inviting all the presidential candidates in election years to the conference. In fact, Donald Trump’s attendance this year has drawn backlash from attendees, some of whom plan to boycott his speech on Monday.

RELATED: Rabbis plan boycott of Trump at AIPAC

A petition started by Max Blumenthal, the son of former Clinton adviser Sidney Blumenthal and a pro-Palestinian writer, had garnered more then 5,000 signatures urging Sanders not to speak at AIPAC. One of the signers is Pink Floyd musician Roger Waters, who has endorsed Sanders.

On the other hand, foreign policy writer Robert Naiman wrote an open letter to Sanders encouraging him to speak at AIPAC — urging him to be a “truth-teller” to the group. Naiman is critical of the group’s hard-line pro-Israel stance.

AIPAC lobbies politicians on its pro-Israel agenda and energizes Americans around strengthening the U.S.-Israel relationship. Its annual conference is a must-stop for politicians every year looking to appear before the influential audience.

The group has also been a source of criticism for the anti-Zionist and pro-Palestinian movement in the U.S., as well as other pro-Israel groups who believes AIPAC takes too rigid a stance against the Iran nuclear deal.

Bernie Sanders will not attend AIPAC conference

AIPAC has a tradition of inviting all the presidential candidates in election years to the conference. In fact, Donald Trump’s attendance this year has drawn backlash from attendees, some of whom plan to boycott his speech on Monday.

RELATED: Rabbis plan boycott of Trump at AIPAC

A petition started by Max Blumenthal, the son of former Clinton adviser Sidney Blumenthal and a pro-Palestinian writer, had garnered more then 5,000 signatures urging Sanders not to speak at AIPAC. One of the signers is Pink Floyd musician Roger Waters, who has endorsed Sanders.

On the other hand, foreign policy writer Robert Naiman wrote an open letter to Sanders encouraging him to speak at AIPAC — urging him to be a “truth-teller” to the group. Naiman is critical of the group’s hard-line pro-Israel stance.

AIPAC lobbies politicians on its pro-Israel agenda and energizes Americans around strengthening the U.S.-Israel relationship. Its annual conference is a must-stop for politicians every year looking to appear before the influential audience.

The group has also been a source of criticism for the anti-Zionist and pro-Palestinian movement in the U.S., as well as other pro-Israel groups who believes AIPAC takes too rigid a stance against the Iran nuclear deal.

Bernie Sanders will not attend AIPAC conference

AIPAC has a tradition of inviting all the presidential candidates in election years to the conference. In fact, Donald Trump’s attendance this year has drawn backlash from attendees, some of whom plan to boycott his speech on Monday.

RELATED: Rabbis plan boycott of Trump at AIPAC

A petition started by Max Blumenthal, the son of former Clinton adviser Sidney Blumenthal and a pro-Palestinian writer, had garnered more then 5,000 signatures urging Sanders not to speak at AIPAC. One of the signers is Pink Floyd musician Roger Waters, who has endorsed Sanders.

On the other hand, foreign policy writer Robert Naiman wrote an open letter to Sanders encouraging him to speak at AIPAC — urging him to be a “truth-teller” to the group. Naiman is critical of the group’s hard-line pro-Israel stance.

AIPAC lobbies politicians on its pro-Israel agenda and energizes Americans around strengthening the U.S.-Israel relationship. Its annual conference is a must-stop for politicians every year looking to appear before the influential audience.

The group has also been a source of criticism for the anti-Zionist and pro-Palestinian movement in the U.S., as well as other pro-Israel groups who believes AIPAC takes too rigid a stance against the Iran nuclear deal.

In Florida, professor predicts “hate election”

If it comes down to a Trump vs. Clinton matchup, how will Florida vote?

As usual, it’s a tossup.

Even though Donald Trump is alienating Florida’s growing Hispanic population, and Hillary Clinton has high unfavorables of her own, the state is poised to swing once again in November, with voters mobilized to cast a ballot against a candidate rather than for one.

“A lot of anger, even hate, will motivate this election,” said Michael McDonald, associate professor of political science at the University of Florida.

“Republicans are largely dissatisfied with their candidates. None get typically over 50 percent. And on the GOP side, the #NeverTrump movement is trying to prevent Trump from getting the nomination. Within the Republican Party, Trump is a very polarizing figure, and we have indications that in a general election the Democrats will be energized to vote against Trump,” McDonald told WJCT.

“However, with Hillary Clinton, who at this point looks to be solidly in the lead on the Democratic side for the nomination, Republicans have been primed for years to feel antagonistic towards the Clintons. So many Republicans will also be motivated, even the #NeverTrump ones, to find him more palatable than a Hillary Clinton presidency.”

McDonald says despite the intense, negative emotions this cycle, at least voter participation should be robust.

“We could see very high turnout in Florida, as people see very stark differences between the candidates and people go to the polls to make a choice that’s meaningful to them.”

And McDonald says in Florida, what will tell the tale is which voting bloc is most motivated to cast a “hate” vote: energized Latinos in the I-4 corridor, for example, who don’t want Trump, or disaffected white voters who haven’t typically been politically engaged.