The Pinwheel Galaxy

The Pinwheel Galaxy

This picture of a Pinwheel Galaxy, also famous as M101, combines information in a infrared, visible, ultraviolet and X-rays from 4 of NASA’s space-based telescopes. This multi-spectral perspective shows that both immature and aged stars are uniformly distributed along M101’s tightly-wound turn arms. Such combination images concede astronomers to see how facilities in one partial of a spectrum compare adult with those seen in other parts. It is like saying with a unchanging camera, an ultraviolet camera, night-vision goggles and X-ray vision, all during a same time.

The Pinwheel Galaxy is in a constellation of Ursa Major (also famous as a Big Dipper). It is about 70 percent incomparable than a possess Milky Way Galaxy, with a hole of about 170,000 light years, and sits during a stretch of 21 million light years from Earth. This means that a light we’re saying in this picture left a Pinwheel Galaxy about 21 million years ago – many millions of years before humans ever walked a Earth.

Image Credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO; IR UV: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Optical: NASA/STScI