The untold story inside Social Security

The facts the government does not want you to know.
By Dean Kalahar – March 22, 2011

With a 14 trillion dollar national debt and national bankruptcy looming, the United State is facing some sober budget realities. To solve the problem, Congress and the President will be forced to address spending in the largest part of the federal budget made up of what are known as entitlements. These are government programs that are supposed to serve the elderly and the afflicted. Addressing entitlements is made difficult because the programs were designed based on a flawed and some might say corrupt model that had more to do with purchasing political power than care for the elderly. In the largest scam ever perpetrated upon the American taxpayer, politicians sold the program to the public with smoke and mirrors, stole the taxpayer’s money, and then cooked the books. Plain and simply Social Security is a fraud. It will bankrupt America destroying our economy and way of life if it is not reformed.

Read the whole story…
http://freedom-choice-cost.blogspot.com/2011/03/untold-story-inside-social-security.html

 

==============================================================

Social Security on Pace to be Drained by 2037
Jan 27, 2011 – AP
The deficits add a sense of urgency to efforts to improve Social Security’s finances. For much of the past 30 years, Social Security has run big surpluses, which the government has borrowed to spend on other programs. Now that Social Security is running deficits, the federal government will have to find money elsewhere to help pay for retirement, disability and survivor benefits.

  • Social Security has built up a $2.5 trillion surplus since the retirement program was last overhauled in the 1980s.
  • The $2.5 trillion surplus, however, has been borrowed over the years by the federal government and spent on other programs. In return, the Treasury Department has issued bonds to Social Security, guaranteeing repayment with interest.
  • Social Security supporters are adamant that the program will be repaid, just as the U.S. government repays others who invest in U.S. Treasury bonds.

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2011/01/26/politics/main7286861.shtml

================================================

After you absorb those articles, read this:

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2010/10/21/gop-plan-dramatically-cut-social-security-benefits-actuary-finds/

==============================================

My Opinion:

It appears to me that congress wants to attack spending, by trying to write off the 2.5 trillion in government backed IOUs  from programs like Social Security. By figuring out ways to avoid paying them back – they can “reduce the wasteful spending” by our government.

Why don’t our elected officials do the budget in full view of the country and examine each program. Find areas where they can effectively cut or eliminate spending one program at a time. Then vote on each program one by one for funding without riders, without connecting other political agendas, and by making it a real budget effort for the people of this country. Of course start with the big ticket items first – not last!

We may find that it is time to look at programs like Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security another way, as they are essential to the health and welfare of our aging population, our poor, and the US citizens we need to help.

Sure it will take a very long time to go through each and every budget items our government funds, but its time to act like responsible elected officials and do what is right for the country – the whole country. And if it seems too large to review, then maybe there are some things that the government should not be doing. This way we can shrink the government where it can. But again start with the largest budget items first – not last.

Each program can be weighed based off it’s impact to the country, without lobbyists, political agendas or specialty group influence.

I guess that would be too logical.

1 thought on “The untold story inside Social Security”

Comments are closed.